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NCI Fact Sheet.pdf American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)


The ASCO Cancer Foundation funds research and education programs both in the U.S. and abroad.

Click here to view the 2010 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium Testicular Cancer Published reports


National Guideline Clearinghouse, Guidelines on Testicular Cancer
prepared by National Guideline Clearinghouse™ (NGC),
a public resource for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

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Testicular Cancer Therapeutics
GlobalData, the industry analysis specialist, has released its new report, Testicular Cancer Therapeutic – Pipeline Assessment and Market Forecasts to 2017. The report is a source of information and analysis on the global testicular market.

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Florida Doc Refutes US Preventative Services Task Force’s Recommendation Against Early TC Screenings of Asymptomatic Patients
News-Press September 12, 2011

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Second Malignancy Link in TC Probed
Journal Of Oncology
September 2011

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FDA Says Cancer Drug Shortage Getting Worse
US News and World Report
8/24/2011

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Radiotherapy for Stage 1 TC
Best Health
July 28, 2011

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No Sign Scans After Testicle Cancer Cause New Tumors
Journal of Clinical Oncology, online
June 20, 2011

Download Article as PDFYoung male Soldiers potentially at risk for testicular cancer.

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Small Risk Seen for Second Cancer from Radiation Treatment
Newtumors found in patients who had previously received radiation therapy for cancerwere only rarely attributable to the treatment, according to a large data analysis.

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Frequent CT Scanning For Testicular Cancer SurveillanceAssociated With Secondary Malignancies
… older men with early-stage testicular cancer who opt for surveillance with regular CT scans over lymph node removal areat greater risk for secondary cancers.The findings, published online last week in the journal Cancer,indicate that physicians should considerthe risk of new cancers with surveillance when discussingtreatment options with their patients.

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Recent adverse trends in semen quality and testis cancer incidence among Finnish men
Impairedsemen quality and testicular cancer may be linked through a testicular dysgenesissyndrome of foetal origin.

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Cancer Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Testicularcancer can occur at any age, but it is most common between the ages of 15 and35 years. Thereis a secondary peak in incidence after age 60.

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Testicular Cancer Deaths Double with After 40 Diagnosis

Men diagnosed with testicular cancer at 40 years of age or older have twice the risk of dying from the disease as younger patients, according to a study of nearly 28,000 men.

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Continued Shortage of Chemotherapy Drugs Causing Concern
January 11, 2011
Source: NCI Cancer Bulletin

A serious shortage of commonly used chemotherapy drugs that began several years ago and worsened in 2010 is taking a toll on medical facilities and causing concerns among patients and doctors alike, according to representatives from government and professional groups.

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Lymph node growth rate in testicular germ cell tumours: Implications for computedtomography surveillance frequency - Abstract
December 27, 2010
Source: URO Today

To estimate the growth rate of lymph nodes in patients on surveillance for testicular cancer who developed recurrentdisease.

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Legislative Initiatives

A summary of new measures enacted during the 2nd quarter of 2010.

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Height Might Affect Risk Of Testicular Cancer
October 28, 2010
Source: Medical News Today

After analyzing data from more than 10000 men, scientists found that for every 2 inches above an average height of 5 feet 9 inches the risk for testicular cancer increased by 13%.

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Marijuana use and testicular germ cell tumors - Abstract
November 12, 2010
Source: UroToday

The finding of an association between frequent marijuana use and TGCTs, particularly among men with nonseminoma, was consistent with the findings of a previous report

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Combination Chemotherapy With Gemcitabine PlusOxaliplatin in Patients With Intensively Pretreated orRefractory Germ Cell Cancer: A Study of the GermanTesticular Cancer Study Group
January 1, 2004
Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology

Long-term survival is rarely achieved in patients with cisplatin-refractory germ cell cancer (GCT). Bothsingle-agent gemcitabine and oxaliplatin have shown activity in patients who experience relapse or arerefractory to cisplatin treatment. This study investigates the activity of a gemcitabine plus oxaliplatinregimen in these patients.

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Impaired Testicular Function in Patients With Carcinoma-In-Situ of the Testis
January 1, 1999
Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology

To elucidate the biologic association between germ cell neoplasia and testicular dysfunction, through investigation of Leydig cell function and semenquality in men with carcinoma-in-situ (CIS) of the testis.

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Screening for Testicular Cancer: An Evidence Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
September 21, 2010
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine

In 2008, approximately 8000 men in the United States received a diagnosis of testicular cancer, and 380 men died of it. The overall incidence of testicular cancer is 5.4 cases per 100 000 men, and white men have the highest incidence, at 6.3 cases per 100 000 men.

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Comic Books Featuring 'Super Heroes' Educate Young Men About Testicular Cancer
September 24, 2010
Source: Medical News Today

Comic books may help to educate young men and their partners about testicular cancer and its early symptoms and encourage them to do more self-screening, according to Ryerson University School of Fashion professor and comic book artist David Brame.

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Genitourinary cancer predisposition syndromes - Abstract
September 27, 2010
Source: Uro Today

Despite epidemiologic data supporting a significant genetic contribution to the cause of genitourinary malignancies, their diagnosis rarely results in clinical genetics referral and the heritability of prostate, bladder, kidney, and testicular cancer remains poorly understood.

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Cytotoxic Testicular Cancer Treatment May Raise CVD Risk
September 24, 2010
Source: Modern Medicine

Men who receive chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT), or a combination of the two as treatment for testicular cancer (TC) may be at increased long-term risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Screening for Testicular Cancer: A Medpage Today Report

The study concluded that although no new recommendations for or against screening for testicular cancer could be established from the review, healthcare professionals should keep testicular cancer as a differential diagnosis in patients who present testicular or scrotal symptoms.


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Testicular Cancer Linked to Abnormal Development in the Womb, Doctors Find
August 29, 2010
Source: Bloomberg

Testicular cancer may be linked with abnormal fetal development, according to scientists who have developed a model to investigate how human testes develop in baby boys while they are in the womb.

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Prenatal DDT Exposure and Testicular Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study
August 29, 2010
Source: Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health

Testicular cancer is more common in Caucasians and among men with a family history of testicular cancer, a personal history of cryptorchidism or testicular cancer, and possibly among men of tall stature.

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New technique will help scientists study abnormal testicles
August 9, 2010
Source: BioNews

Scientists have successfully grafted human testicular tissue into mice, llowing them to study for the first time how boys' testicles develop in the womb.

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ASCO issues guideline for the use of tumor markers for men with germ cell tumors
June 25, 2010
Source: HemOnc Today

A new clinical guideline on the use of serum markers in men with germ cell tumors was recently issued by ASCO at its 2010 annual meeting. The guideline, established by a panel of experts, was discussed by Timothy D. Gilligan, MD, co-chair of ASCO’s GERM Cell Tumor Markers Committee, and published online in The Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Testicular sparing surgery for small masses - Abstract
June 24, 2010
Source: UroToday

To determine the proportion of benign testicular lesions among candidates for testicular sparing surgery (TSS) and to assess the safety and efficacy of this procedure.

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Testicular Cancer Treatments May Incur Risks
June 22, 2010
Source: Renal and Urology News

CHICAGO—Testicular cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), researchers reported at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. These patients also are at higher risk for hypertension and diabetes.

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Scientists Identify Three New Genetic Variants that Increase Testicular Cancer Risk

June 14, 2010
Source: Health News

A study led by The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) has identified three new genetic risk factors for testicular cancer. The findings, published online today in Nature Genetics, come during the Everyman Male Cancer Awareness Month, which aims to increase awareness and funding for vital research into testicular and prostate cancers.

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Paternity and testicular function among testicular cancer survivors treated with two to four cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy - Abstract
April 29, 2010
Source: UroToday

 

A national multicentre follow-up survey assessing morbidity among survivors of unilateral TC diagnosed from 1980 to 1994 was conducted during the period 1998 to 2002. Of the 1814 men invited, 1462 (80.6%) participated by responding to a mailed questionnaire and/or undergoing a clinical examination including laboratory assessments. The present study includes the 316 participants up to 65 yr of age treated with two to four cycles of standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy without additional treatment beyond surgery.

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Familial testicular germ cell tumors in adults: 2010 summary of genetic risk factors and clinical phenotype - Abstract
April 7, 2010
Source: UroToday

Familial aggregations of testicular germ cell tumor (FTGCT) have been well described, suggesting the existence of a hereditary TGCT subset. Approximately 1.4% of newly diagnosed TGCT patients report a positive family history of TGCT. Sons and siblings of TGCT patients have four- to sixfold and eight- to tenfold increases in TGCT risk respectively. Segregation analyses suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Linkage analyses have identified several genomic regions of modest interest, although no high-penetrance cancer susceptibility gene has been mapped yet. These data suggest that the combined effects of multiple common alleles, each conferring modest risk, might underlie familial testicular cancer.

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Beyond the Abstract - Public perceptions of the harms and benefits of testicular cancer education: A qualitative study, by Ruth E. C. Evans, et al.
April 7, 2010
Source: UroToday


BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - Regular testicular self-examination (TSE) is frequently promoted within testicular cancer (TC) public education materials as a means to detect cancer early.

As yet there is no evidence demonstrating the clinical benefit of TSE practise and in an era of evidence-based medicine this has led to criticism over its promotion. While it is generally agreed that detecting cancer earlier would mean less intensive treatment, opponents of TC and TSE public education have argued that there is a danger of creating unnecessary anxiety about a rare disease for which treatment is so successful that even in late stage cure rates are in excess of 90%.

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Positive attitude improves mental health of testicular cancer patients
April 3, 2010
Source: ANI

Washington, DC: Men with testicular cancer who write positively about their experience show signs of improved mental health afterward, in contrast to men who write negatively or neutrally about their condition, according to results of a Baylor University pilot study.

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Paternity and Testicular Function Among Testicular Cancer Survivors Treated With Two to Four Cycles of Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy
March 24, 2010
Source: European Association of Urology

A national multicentre follow-up survey assessing morbidity among survivors of unilateral TC diagnosed from 1980 to 1994 was conducted during the period 1998 to 2002. Of the 1814 men invited, 1462 (80.6%) participated by responding to a mailed questionnaire and/or undergoing a clinical examination including laboratory assessments. The present study includes the 316 participants up to 65 yr of age treated with two to four cycles of standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy without additional treatment beyond surgery.

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Long-term neurologic and peripheral vascular toxicity after chemotherapy treatment of testicular cancer

March 11, 2010

Source: Wiley InterScience

Testicular cancer is curable in the majority of men, and persisting treatment toxicity is a concern. The authors report a cross-sectional study of the long-term effects of chemotherapy (C) on neurologic function and development of Raynaud phenomenon.

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Changing patterns of testicular cancer among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white Americans in the twenty and twenty-first centuries: A study of the SEER database.
March 10, 2010
Source: American Society of Clinical Oncology


Background: Testis cancer incidence, histology, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) vary by Hispanic ethnicity. However, the change in these trends over time and the impact of socioeconomic status on CSS remain unclear. Methods: We queried 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database registries for Hispanic (HW) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients diagnosed with testis cancer from 1988 through 2005.

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MRI: Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tool For Diagnosing Testicular Cancer

February 22, 2010
Source: Redorbit News


Researchers have found that non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a good diagnostic tool for the evaluation and staging of testicular cancer and may improve patient care by sparing some men unnecessary surgery, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Testicular Cancer Survivors May Have Hormone Deficiency

February 22, 2010
Source: HealthDay


Testosterone deficiency in young male cancer survivors often causes low energy levels and reduced quality of life, and these patients may benefit from testosterone replacement therapy, a new study suggests.

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UPDATED GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, STAGING, AND TREATMENT OF TESTICULAR CANCER


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Myocardial infarction and other major vascular events during chemotherapy for testicular cancer - Abstract

February 4, 2010
Source: Department of Urology, Albertinen-Krankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg.


Chronic vascular morbidity resulting form chemotherapy for testicular germ-cell cancer (TGCC) is recognized. Cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurring early during chemotherapy are less understood. We evaluated the incidence and clinical features of CVEs associated with chemotherapy of TGCC.

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Public perceptions of the harms and benefits of testicular cancer education: A qualitative study - Abstract
February 3, 2010
Source: UroToday.com Testicular Cancer Section


The value of testicular cancer (TC) education, and in particular advice on testicular self-examination (TSE), has been widely debated by health professionals. One concern centres on its potential to cause unnecessary anxiety among the target population. Views outside the health professional community about TC education's potential benefits and harms have not previously been described. The objective of this study was to investigate the range of views expressed by specific groups thought to have an interest in provision of TC education.

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Identification of spermatozoa in archived testicular cancer specimens: Implications for bench side sperm retrieval at orchiectomy - Abstract
February 2, 2010
Source: UroToday.com Testicular Cancer Section


To evaluate the patterns of spermatogenesis in the normal testicular parenchyma of primary testicular cancers and estimate the feasibility of sperm retrieval at the time of radical orchiectomy.

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Relatives of boys with sexual birth defects not at risk for testicular germ cell cancer
December 21, 2009
Source: Journal of the National Cancer Institute


Boys with the sexual birth defects known as hypospadias and cryptorchidism are at risk for developing testicular germ cell cancer, but their relatives are not, according to a new study published online December 21 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Cisplatin-based chemotherapy linked to severe side effects in long-term survivors of testicular cancer

November 30, 2009

Source: HemOncToday

Long-term survivors of unilateral testicular cancer treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy had more dosedependent neurological side effects and Raynaud-like phenomena, or discoloration of the fingers and toes upon exposure to cold, when compared with patients who were not treated with chemotherapy, according to the results of a follow-up study.

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Long-term effects of testicular cancer chemo seen
November 25, 2009
By Laura Bucholz courtesy of Reuters


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men wondering about the long-term side effects of chemotherapy for testicular cancer may now have a road map defining likely outcomes.

A Norwegian study, published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, reveals that long-term side effects vary depending on the dose of
chemotherapy given and how many cycles of chemotherapy the men received.

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Treatment not testicular cancer poses greatest risk to survivors' long-term health
October 15, 2009
Source: http://www.physorg.com


Testicular cancer survivors can face an increased risk of long-term illness, not because of the malignancy, but the highly effective treatment they receive, according to a study in the urology journal BJUI.

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Treatment not testicular cancer poses greatest risk to survivors' long-term health
October 15, 2009
Source: Physorg.com


Testicular cancer survivors can face an increased risk of long-term illness, not because of the malignancy, but the highly effective treatment they receive, according to a study in the urology journal BJUI.

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Environmental Chemicals Found In Breast Milk And High Incidence Of Testicular Cancer
September 25, 2009
Source: Science Daily


A comparison of breast milk samples from Denmark and Finland revealed a significant difference in environmental chemicals which have previously been implicated in testicular cancer or in adversely affecting development of the fetal testis in humans and animals.

This finding is published in the International Journal of Andrology.

Check with your own physician. The AAP continues to recommend breastfeeding, whenever possible.


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Time trends in the incidence of testicular cancer in childhood and young adulthood -Abstract
August 3, 2009
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.


There has been a steep increase in the incidence of adult testicular cancer in many populations, but in spite of numerous studies, the etiology of testicular cancer remains elusive. The time trends of childhood testicular tumors are less clear and have been studied in a few populations. To further evaluate whether or not adult and childhood cancers share trend determinants and whether future adult testicular cancer incidences can be predicted through childhood testicular cancer incidences, their rates were compared.

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Second Gene Linked to Familial Testicular Cancer
June 29, 2009
Source: National Institutes of Health


Specific variations or mutations in a particular can gene raise a man’s risk of familial, or inherited, testicular germ-cell cancer, the most common form of this disease, according to new research by scientists at the National Institutes of Health. This is only the second gene to be identified that affects the risk of familial testicular cancer, and the first gene in a key biochemical pathway. The study appeared online June 23, 2009, in Cancer Research.

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Paediatric Testicular Cancer: An Updated Review of Incidence and Conditional Survival from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Database - Abstract
June 10, 2009
Source: Division of Paediatric Urology, University of minnesota, Minneapolis, MN


To determine, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based database, the epidemiological variables and update the understanding of testicular tumours in children, as knowledge of their incidence and survival is predicated upon multi-institutional cooperation.

Using the SEER database, we ascertained the incidence rate, 5-year survival by disease stage at diagnosis, and 5-year conditional survival after surviving for 1-3 years for cases recorded between 1973 and 2005. We stratified the incidence rate by race and histology to examine if these factors affect disease characteristics.

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Penn Medicine - Penn researchers discover genetic risk factor for testicular cancer
June 2, 2009
Source: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine / University of Pennsylvania Health System


PHILADELPHIA – Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have uncovered variation around two genes that are associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among young men, and its incidence among non-Hispanic Caucasian men has doubled in the last 40 years -- it now affects seven out of 100,000 white men in the United States each year. The discovery, published in the May 31, 2009 online issue of Nature Genetics, is the first step toward understanding which men are at high risk of disease.

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UroToday - Maternal smoking, alcohol, and coffee use during pregnancy and son's risk of testicular cancer
June 1, 2009
Source: UroToday

It has been suggested that increased risk for testicular cancer occurring worldwide may be due to exposures during fetal development. Lifestyle or environmental exposures may be the most important predictors of risk. However, few studies have directly examined these exposures prospectively. The Child Health and Development Studies is a 40-year follow-up of 20,530 pregnancies occurring between 1959 and 1967.

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Mail Online - Scientists pinpoint faulty genes in new hope for testicular cancer test.

June 1, 2009
By Fiona Macrae

Genes behind testicular canc er have been pinpointed for the first time, paving the way for a test to identify those at high risk of developing the disease.

Scientists already knew that men with a close relative with the cancer are more likely to get it themselves.

But the breakthrough will hasten the development of a screening programme that could improve rates of early detection and prevention.

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Science Daily - Genetic risk factor for testicular cancer discovered: Gene is associated with a three-fold increase in risk
June 1, 2009
Source: Science Daily


ScienceDaily (June 1, 2009) — Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have uncovered variation around two genes that are associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among young men, and its incidence among non
-Hispanic Caucasian men has doubled in the last 40 years -- it now affects seven out of 100,000 white men in the United States each year. The discovery, published in the May 31, 2009 online issue of Nature Genetics, is the first step toward understanding which men are at high risk of disease.

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BBC News - Testicular cancer genetic advance
May 31, 2009
Source: BBC News


Researchers have for the first time found inherited genetic factors which raise the risk of testicular cancer.

A UK team found many testicular cancer patients shared common DNA variants on chromosomes five, six and 12 that healthy men did not have.

This finding was echoed in a separate US study in the same journal, Nature Genetics, which highlighted two of the same variations.

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Reuters - Study finds infertility-testicular cancer link

February 23, 2009
By Michael Conlon; editing by Maggie Fox


CHICAGO (Reuters) - Infertile men are nearly three times more likely to develop testicular cancer than those who are fertile, U.S. researchers reported on Monday.

The finding suggests a common source for both problems, perhaps errors in the way the body tries to repair damage to genetic material or environmental factors, Dr. Thomas...

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Reuters - Marijuana may raise testicular cancer risk: study
February 9, 2009
By Will Dunham


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Marijuana use may increase the risk of developing testicular cancer, in particular a more aggressive form of the disease, according to a U.S. study published on Monday.

The study of 369 Seattle-area men ages 18 to 44 with testicular cancer and 979 men in the same age bracket without the disease found that current marijuana users were 70 percent more likely to develop it compared to nonusers.

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Reuters - DDT-related chemical linked to testicular cancer
April 29, 2008
By Will Dunham

WASHINGTON, April 29 (Reuters) - A chemical that comes from the pesticide DDT may raise a man's risk of developing testicular cancer, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.

They found a clear link between testicular cancer and DDE, which is created when the body or the environment breaks down the pesticide DDT.

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